University of Utah Logo / Link
Historic Fort Douglas at the University of Utah
Fort Douglas Logo / Link

Welcome  |  History  |  Today  |  Periods  |  Virtual Tour  | Walking Tour  | More Information  |  Disclaimer

Virtual Tour - Neighborhood #1

Neighborhood #1 on site map
Neighborhood #1

Pedestrian Bridge:  The newest way to access Fort Douglas is via the pedestrian path and bridge that spans Wasatch Drive.  Built in 2001, the bridge links the main campus with Fort Douglas behind Building 623 and connects to the pedestrian path that leads up to Fort Douglas Boulevard between Building 649 and Chapel Glen in Neighborhood #5.

Stilwell Field:  This is the original parade ground laid out by Colonel Patrick Edward Connor in 1863.  It was used for morning roll call, morning and evening respects to the colors, work assignments, training, games and recreation, parades, and ceremonies.  Many of the large trees surrounding the parade field were planted in the 1860s.  After World War II, the parade ground was named after General Joseph Stilwell who was commander of all U.S. forces in the China-Burma-India area during World War II.  He served as Chief of Staff to Chiang Kai-Shek, and was the first American General to command a Chinese Army. 
The current flagpole was erected in July of 1954 replacing a 1902 flagpole of similar size and design.  The monument near the flagpole commemorates the valiant conduct of the men of the 38th Infantry Regiment during World War I.  The regimental motto, “Rock of the Marne,” came from the 38th’s heroic stand against the Germans along the Marne River in 1918.

Building 618: This two-story barracks, built in 1872–1873, is the oldest surviving barracks at Fort Douglas.  It was extensively remodeled in 1912 when the barracks became housing for three officers and their families.  Hipped dormers replaced the front and rear gables and three individual porches with Tuscan columns replaced the full-facade front porch .  The Tuscan columns were replaced with wrought iron in the 1950s.

Building 619:  This one-story barracks for 40 men was built in 1875.  It was extensively remodeled in 1912 when the barracks became housing for three officers and their families.  The original full-facade front porch was removed and replaced by a small porch in the center with Tuscan columns.  A similar porch was located on each side as well.  The Tuscan columns were replaced with wrought iron in the 1950s.

Buildings 620:  This one-story barracks for 40 men was built in 1875.  It was remodeled in 1912 for use as an administrative building.  In 1929, it was extensively remodeled to serve as the residence for the Commanding Officer, at which time, the Colonial Revival details such as the cornice and projecting pedimented porch were added to the building.  The University adapted this building for use as a conference center in 2001.  The existing large living/dining room became the main conference room and interior walls separating the bedrooms and bathrooms were removed to create three additional conference rooms. 

Buildings 621-625:  These buildings, similar to Building 603 in Neighborhood #5, were built in 1931 as quarters for the senior officers and their families as part of a nationwide Army building program initiated in 1927 to upgrade the living conditions of officers, non-commissioned officers, and enlisted men.  The building program was implemented in the 1930s using funds from the Army, the Works Progress Administration, and the Public Works Administration.  Designed by the Quartermaster General’s Office in Washington, D.C., the standard plans could be modified depending on regional style.  At Fort Douglas, the Colonial Revival style was chosen.

Buildings 631 & 632:  Built as barracks in 1875, these two buildings now serve as the Fort Douglas Military Museum.  Prior to being part of the Museum, Building 631 was used as the post school, fire station, district headquarters for the Civil Conservation Corps, and a mess hall.  In the late 1940s, the Post Office and Chaplain’s office were moved to this building.  During the 1920s and 1930s, Building 632 served as the Regimental Headquarters for the 38th Infantry, and was the Post Office during World War II. 
In the 1950’s, the Judge Advocate General’s office was located in Building 632.  After housing a variety of other offices, it was officially opened as a military museum in 1975.  These buildings originally had a frame veranda, without railing, that extended across the entire front and was supported on stone piers.  In 1939 the concrete deck and wood railing were added, and the area beneath was enclose.
Back to the begining.

Welcome  |  History  |  Today  |  Periods  |  Virtual Tour  | Walking Tour  | More Information  |  Disclaimer

Continue to the next site.